Members, Log In. Not a member? Sign Up

Ultimate Rollercoaster > Discussion Forums > Europe Coasters, Parks & Attractions > A vocabulary doubt

A vocabulary doubt

Posted: 12/23/07 at 8:04:10 AM
Views: 1818

I am reading the amusement parks and rollercoaster history written by Adam Sandy in this web site and i don`t understand exactly what is the meaning of:

A mobious track (there have been built only three throght the history).

I am spanish so it is more difficult to me!

Thanks

User Submitted Picture

http://www.ultimaterollercoaster.com/coasters/history/1960_1970/index.shtml

Re: A vocabulary doubt by Graeme Graeme Profile at 12/23/07 2:48:27 PM

A mobious coaster is a type of racing coaster. However, whilst they look like they have two tracks, they only have one. The left track ends up meeting the right track.

The coasters are:

Grand National
Racer (Kennywood)
Montana Rusa (La Feria)

Imagine this. In the station, you board in the right-hand train. The other train is on your left. You then move out of the station and turn 180-degrees right, whilst the other train turns 180-degrees left.

When you next meet up, your train is on the left. You spend the coaster racing the other train, and end up on the left, even though you boarded on the right.

Re: A vocabulary doubt by Simon_Baynham at 12/24/07 7:06:49 AM

Hi URC readers

Although it was destroyed in 1969. Euclid Beach Park's Racing Coaster was of a moebius design too.

Interestingly, the left-hand train ascended the lift quicker than the right-sided train, so in theory they would reach the summit together, resulting in a fair race.

How many other (defunct) woodies employed the moebius principal, I wonder?

Read you all soon

Simon Baynham

Re: A vocabulary doubt by NudoA NudoA Profile at 12/25/07 6:15:30 PM

Thanks for your answers!! Reading the chapter: "sixties wooden coasters" i have found more coasters` expressions which i don`t understand.

1) Double out and back layout.

2) Airtime

3) A figure eight (maybe the rollercoaster`s layout is like an eight shape??)

4) Split lift hill

5) An out and back with a few twists

6) Shuttle loop (this is the atracction in which you go up like in a elevator and then you fall down due to gravity energy??)

Talking about other things in the previous chapter "sixties amusement parks" is written the following:

" Two rides were introduced at this park that revolutionized the theme park industry and established Arrow Dynamics as a major player in the roller coaster field.

In 1963 Six Flags over Texas introduced El Aserradero (Spanish for the sawmill), an Arrow Development log flume. The ride was very similar to the many flumes the company produced over the years. It featured two drops, the first low and the second high, and four passenger logs that floated through the course. That same year an Arrow log ride opened at Cedar Point. "

In Madrid, my city, we have two parks, a new warner bros. park (was built 5 or 6 years ago) and a very old traditional park that was themed 10 years ago pretty much. So, in this last park called " Parque de Atracciones de Madrid" and located in a big green area of the city (Casa de Campo) there is a log flume also called "El Aserradero"...now i know why... or maybe is a coincidence.

bye bye

Re: A vocabulary doubt by NudoA NudoA Profile at 12/29/07 3:35:04 PM

Thanks for your answers!! Reading the chapter: "sixties wooden coasters" i have found more coasters` expressions which i don`t understand.

1) Double out and back layout.

2) Airtime

3) A figure eight (maybe the rollercoaster`s layout is like an eight shape??)

4) Split lift hill

5) An out and back with a few twists

6) Shuttle loop (this is the atracction in which you go up like in a elevator and then you fall down due to gravity energy??)

Talking about other things in the previous chapter "sixties amusement parks" is written the following:

" Two rides were introduced at this park that revolutionized the theme park industry and established Arrow Dynamics as a major player in the roller coaster field.

In 1963 Six Flags over Texas introduced El Aserradero (Spanish for the sawmill), an Arrow Development log flume. The ride was very similar to the many flumes the company produced over the years. It featured two drops, the first low and the second high, and four passenger logs that floated through the course. That same year an Arrow log ride opened at Cedar Point. "

In Madrid, my city, we have two parks, a new warner bros. park (was built 5 or 6 years ago) and a very old traditional park that was themed 10 years ago pretty much. So, in this last park called " Parque de Atracciones de Madrid" and located in a big green area of the city (Casa de Campo) there is a log flume also called "El Aserradero"...now i know why... or maybe is a coincidence.

bye bye