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Ultimate Rollercoaster > Discussion Forums > Roller Coasters, Parks & Attractions > What's the future for coaster?

What's the future for coaster?

xPoizon

Posted:
8/17/13 at
7:42:51 PM

It started with wood
Then steel, looping, wild mouse, racing, stand up, boomerang, launched, inverted, floorless, flying, mega, giga, impulse, motorbike, winged, wooden with inversions, on and on, etc.

My point is: what is the next big thing? Stand up wing coaster? Taller? Faster? Or a completely new idea like when the invert first came out?

The sky's the limit, so let me know what you think?

Re: What's the future for coaster? by antikythera antikythera Profile at 8/17/13 7:50:08 PM
Realisticly, I'd like to see them somehow perfect the materials that make up the coaster so that trains and the track/supports last longer.

They are always coming out with new wheels that provide a smoother ride and require less maintenance. I can see them doing the same with the supports and track.

Take a look at I305. As bad as Intamin has been this year with their motors blowing out and cables snapping, they managed to build a 300ft coaster lift and first drop with only three points of support.

To me, that's pretty impressive and only shows how far we can go to make great coasters that take up a small footprint.

Personally, I think it will fall into two camps: those companies that want to make new ride experiences and those who will want to create more reliable rides. I think some will fall into both camps, but succeed on different levels.

* This post was modified at 8/17/13 7:51:27 PM *

Re: What's the future for coaster? by AngryGumball AngryGumball Profile at 8/17/13 8:23:13 PM
The only limitations I can really see on our future, especially here in the states are how intense our rides will be...part of my wondering why we have yet to see an Intamin Megalite in the US...wouldn't mind seeing one in CA, where until the past couple years, we lack in any real airtime machines.
Re: What's the future for coaster? by rollercoastersfreak rollercoastersfreak Profile at 8/18/13 2:54:42 AM
I agree with the Mega Lite needing to be in the US. I rode one here in Japan a couple months ago and it was a great ride. Lot's of airtime. I think the US also needs to get a ride with a greater than 90 degree drop. I rode a coaster in Japan yesterday with a 121 degree drop and it was the craziest thing I've ever ridden. One of my friends though came up with a new idea for a coaster that sounded interesting. Instead of seating forward or backward. Sitting sideways. It sounded like it could be an interesting idea. Or another good idea is making taller coasters. When Top Thrill Dragster was opened no it reached new heights. Why not try making a Hyper over 500 ft.

Brandon Carlson

Re: What's the future for coaster? by GoYanks34 GoYanks34 Profile at 8/18/13 9:41:32 AM
antikythera said:

Realisticly, I'd like to see them somehow perfect the materials that make up the coaster so that trains and the track/supports last longer.


They are always coming out with new wheels that provide a smoother ride and require less maintenance. I can see them doing the same with the supports and track.

Take a look at I305. As bad as Intamin has been this year with their motors blowing out and cables snapping, they managed to build a 300ft coaster lift and first drop with only three points of support.

To me, that's pretty impressive and only shows how far we can go to make great coasters that take up a small footprint.

Personally, I think it will fall into two camps: those companies that want to make new ride experiences and those who will want to create more reliable rides. I think some will fall into both camps, but succeed on different levels.

Um, I-305 went down this season too.

Jen

Re: What's the future for coaster? by antikythera antikythera Profile at 8/18/13 11:37:07 AM
GoYanks34 said:

antikythera said:

Realisticly, I'd like to see them somehow perfect the materials that make up the coaster so that trains and the track/supports last longer.


They are always coming out with new wheels that provide a smoother ride and require less maintenance. I can see them doing the same with the supports and track.

Take a look at I305. As bad as Intamin has been this year with their motors blowing out and cables snapping, they managed to build a 300ft coaster lift and first drop with only three points of support.

To me, that's pretty impressive and only shows how far we can go to make great coasters that take up a small footprint.

Personally, I think it will fall into two camps: those companies that want to make new ride experiences and those who will want to create more reliable rides. I think some will fall into both camps, but succeed on different levels.

Um, I-305 went down this season too.

Jen

Yeah I know. I wasn't saying Intamin is exempt from problems. They are a pardox in that their three point design is great, but their execution on everything else is poor.

That's why I said with varying success.

Re: What's the future for coaster? by GoYanks34 GoYanks34 Profile at 8/18/13 11:40:03 AM
antikythera said:

GoYanks34 said:

antikythera said:

Realisticly, I'd like to see them somehow perfect the materials that make up the coaster so that trains and the track/supports last longer.


They are always coming out with new wheels that provide a smoother ride and require less maintenance. I can see them doing the same with the supports and track.

Take a look at I305. As bad as Intamin has been this year with their motors blowing out and cables snapping, they managed to build a 300ft coaster lift and first drop with only three points of support.

To me, that's pretty impressive and only shows how far we can go to make great coasters that take up a small footprint.

Personally, I think it will fall into two camps: those companies that want to make new ride experiences and those who will want to create more reliable rides. I think some will fall into both camps, but succeed on different levels.

Um, I-305 went down this season too.

Jen

Yeah I know. I wasn't saying Intamin is exempt from problems. They are a pardox in that their three point design is great, but their execution on everything else is poor.

That's why I said with varying success.

Ah - I misinterpreted what you were saying.

Jen

Re: What's the future for coaster? by alpengeistno3 at 8/18/13 12:24:03 PM
rollercoastersfreak said:

I agree with the Mega Lite needing to be in the US. I rode one here in Japan a couple months ago and it was a great ride. Lot's of airtime. I think the US also needs to get a ride with a greater than 90 degree drop. I rode a coaster in Japan yesterday with a 121 degree drop and it was the craziest thing I've ever ridden.

Ever rode Fahrenheit? Maverick? Steel Hawg? Don't all those Eurofighters have a beyond vertical drop?

I think we have plenty of beyond 90 degree dropping coasters here. Problem is that the drops are so short at just barely topping 100 ft, any amazing airtime is quickly dissipated.

Paul

* This post was modified at 8/18/13 12:28:52 PM *