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Ultimate Rollercoaster > Discussion Forums > Roller Coasters, Parks & Attractions > New pics of BKF interlocked corkscrews

New pics of BKF interlocked corkscrews

Michael

Posted:
4/1/00 at
9:15:10 PM

Was just over at SFO: A Refreshing Look and they have updated with some awesome close ups of BKF's interlocked corkscrews. I thought I would let everyone know. I don't know how the contributor got so close without being caught. Also, what's the difference between a corkscrew and a flat spin? Is it just a manufacturer's term?

SFO: A Refreshing Look

Re: Difference between flat spin and corkscrews. by KMAN KMAN Profile at 4/2/00 8:45:14 PM

Also, what's the
> difference between a corkscrew and a flat
> spin? Is it just a manufacturer's term?

________

A corkscrew is actually 2 flat spins immediately following each other. A ride like Corkscrew at CP or Anaconda at PKD feature corkscrews.

Newer coasters like B&M's frequently drop out the second inversion and your left with a single, flat spin. --K

Re: Difference between flat spin and corkscrews. by Jeff Tolotti at 4/2/00 10:47:42 PM

> A corkscrew is
> actually 2 flat spins immediately following
> each other.

Ahhh! no! ;)

A corkscrew originally was that, yes, but there have been Arrows that feature corkscrews that aren't double. Arrow's corks (and I believe most others) feature a fixed radius helix on its side. Notice on an Arrow when you're in the corkscrew the train is always at the same angle and just kinda rolls through it.

B&M term their corkscrew-like elements "flat spins." The difference is the top of the inversion, where they significantly tighten the radius resulting in the "pull" or the "flip" you get at the top.

Jeff

Re: Now wait a minute... by Chip Wood at 4/3/00 2:47:20 PM

Ahhh! no! ;) A corkscrew originally was that,
> yes, but there have been Arrows that feature
> corkscrews that aren't double. Arrow's corks
> (and I believe most others) feature a fixed
> radius helix on its side. Notice on an Arrow
> when you're in the corkscrew the train is
> always at the same angle and just kinda
> rolls through it. B&M term their
> corkscrew-like elements "flat
> spins." The difference is the top of
> the inversion, where they significantly
> tighten the radius resulting in the
> "pull" or the "flip" you
> get at the top. Jeff

Jeff, or whomever- I thought a B&M helix was called a flat spin. The SFO corporate release stated that the ride would have the cobra roll, the loop, TWO INTERLOCKING CORKSCREWS, and a FLATSPIN.

I even posted a question about these elements when they were announced (on this very forum I'm quite sure) that asked the question.

So, does BKF have two inetrlocking FLATSPINS.. or ... what? What about the final helix? Do they call that a corkscrew? I'm perplexed!

Thanks for your patience... I'm confused by PR.

Chip

SFO: A Refreshing Look

Re: Difference between flat spin and heartline by Bruce Jensen at 4/3/00 3:56:02 PM

Jeff wrote:

> B&M term their
> corkscrew-like elements "flat
> spins." The difference is the top of
> the inversion, where they significantly
> tighten the radius resulting in the
> "pull" or the "flip" you get at the top

OK - then how does this differ from a heartline (which I favor above all others)?

Bruce Jensen

Re: Now wait a minute... by Jeff Tolotti at 4/3/00 4:46:56 PM

> Jeff, or whomever- I thought a B&M
> helix was called a flat spin.

Incorrectly, yes, I've seen helices called flat spins. They're not. B&M uses the term "High speed spiral" for a helix or helix-like element.

> So, does BKF have two inetrlocking
> FLATSPINS.. or ... what?

Yes. (Way up in the air looking dumb. :)

> What about the
> final helix? Do they call that a corkscrew?

High speed spiral :}

Jeff

Re: Difference between flat spin and heartline by Jeff Tolotti at 4/3/00 4:51:51 PM

> OK - then how does this differ
> from a heartline (which I favor above all
> others)?

Heartline (or as B&M call it, "zero-g-roll" or "rotation in weightless condition" - I've seen both used on blueprints) on a B&M involves a straight (or mostly straight) parabolic ascent and descent with a 360 degree roll at the top. Flatspins don't have the parabolic aspect, and the peak of the flatspin is more or less perpendicular to the entry and exit.

Jeff

Thanks! (nm) by Bruce Jensen at 4/3/00 6:08:28 PM

Heartline (or as B&M call it,
> "zero-g-roll" or "rotation in
> weightless condition" - I've seen both
> used on blueprints) on a B&M involves a
> straight (or mostly straight) parabolic
> ascent and descent with a 360 degree roll at
> the top. Flatspins don't have the parabolic
> aspect, and the peak of the flatspin is more
> or less perpendicular to the entry and exit.
> Jeff

Re: Ok I got it now. by Chip Wood at 4/4/00 4:37:32 PM

Thank you Jeff-

So, BKF has one big 'verticle loop', one 'cobra roll', two 'interlocking FLATSPINS', and one 'High speed spiral'.

Someone get on the horn and call the PR people from SFO- they might want to know this stuff...

Chip

SFO: A Refreshing Look