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Ultimate Rollercoaster > Discussion Forums > Roller Coasters, Parks & Attractions > My complete breakdown of Skyrush

My complete breakdown of Skyrush

alpengeistno3

Posted:
7/2/12 at
4:22:39 AM

I had wanted to post this the day after our URC gathering at Hershey back in mid-June, however, with the forums being down for the rest of the weekend and most of the following week, I decided to hold off until after our ACE event this past Saturday. I remember asking “why is everyone posting TR’s about Hershey that focus solely on Skyrush?” Well, after my 3 rides on June 14th, it became “painfully” clear, much pun intended. Jen covered all of "the sides" of our trip, so I will give kudos to her and move right to the main course.

I’ll start with the layout. The ride uses a cable lift that gets you to the top in record time. You are flung over into a 1st drop that is indescribable. There is the typical pop of air at the top followed by a sudden jolt of ejector air right before the bottom and a high positive G right turn into the 2nd hill, which immediately thrusts you into the lapbar. All of this happens in a matter of seconds on the ride. Next, a high speed 180* left turn into the 3rd airtime filled hill that snaps you underneath the 2nd hill. It is just a few feet from being the ultimate head chopper. A right hand 180* turn and rise into a Stengal dive that turns the train up on its side before dropping down into a small “trick track” left bend followed by a hard right hand 180* turn into the last 2 air time hills. The first one has a twist at the top, the second is just straight up and down . One more 90* left turn over Comet before rising into the brake run over Comet’s final brake. The ride turns over Comet’s station to park right next to Comet’s lift.

So, originally I was going to do this “the Good, The Bad, and The Ugly style.” When I used to have to write out report card comments for the kids, we were always told to say something nice about the kid before explaining why they got their grade. After this past weekend, I believe there is hope for the ride, so I’m going to start with “The bad”.

The station set up is, to put it nicely, not good. There are 3 sets of stairs. Two are for the queue line, one for the front row, one for all other rows. If you are going to wait for the front row, I’m not convinced the wait is any longer than the front line queue of any other popular front row rides. With 4 across seating, it can’t be over 30 mins extra from the top of the stairs to the bottom when the line is moving. Just be prepared to watch a lot of people walk by you to walk on the other rows. The bad part is that the loading and unloading take place on the same side of the station. In a baffling move, Hershey decided to put the exit stairs parallel to the other 2 on the same side of the station. There is plenty of room on the other side of the station and if they did not wish for people to walk under the lift because of the cable drive, they could cut down the queue size to allow for a path on the other side of the lift to empty onto the midway. The representative we spoke with on our maintenance tour said that is was something they are looking into next year.

The other problem with the station set-up are the lazy susan-style storage bins. The idea was that people put their stuff in, the bin automatically spins around for them to pick it up after they get off. Unfortunately, Hershey underestimated how much crap people bring in the station with them and the bins are too small for the majority of it. What results is a clusterf#$% of confusion when the train returns to the station. People are trying to find and gather their stuff from the loading side, the crew can’t open the gates or they will hit the people trying to find their stuff, the people waiting are trying put their stuff in the bins that won’t spin because they are jammed with all the stuff, etc. Loading times were in excess of 5 mins when we went in mid June, often taking as long as 10 mins. This past weekend seemed to be better. I only took one ride with GP Saturday and the 1st 4 queue rails in the cattle pen took the exact same 30 mins as the 1st 2 of 2 weeks prior. We only sat on the brake run for approximately 1 min. The maintenance rep on our tour said the bins were supposed to be taller, but operations cut them down in size when they discovered that they interfered with sight-lines in the station.

Now “the Ugly”. I think Hershey wanted an intense thrill ride this time, but I don’t think they completely understood exactly what they were getting with Skyrush. The 1st drop is just soo wrong. I think when Intamin designed the ride, they intended for a typical smooth drop into the 1st turn, but when the ride was constructed, there must have been issues with the 2nd support scaffold clearing Comet’s structure. With the limited space at the bottom due to the hillside, there was no room to push the drop out to reestablish the typical parabolic curve that most drops follow. The result is a parabolic drop with a sudden bump in it as the train clears the 2nd scaffold, resulting in a double dip-type sensation. I have ridden Jack Rabbit at Kennywood. Imagine that type element on a steel coaster at 72 mph and you still don’t have Skyrush’s first drop. Ejector air does not begin to describe it. You are catapulted out of your seat. Coasters like the original Steel Phantom, the Hurlers, and Hercules should have taught coaster designers that it is not a good idea to put a tight turn at the bottom of the 1st drop without properly widening the radius of the turn to dissipate the forces. Intamin has been quite skilled at this until the I-305 debacle and with the extra bump in the 1st drop, Skyrush is no exception. The result is your butt being shot forward from the air time and your shoulders and head going being slammed sideways from the sudden turn right at the bottom. Many people have complained about decapitation from this combo. I don’t know what the G forces are, but this is the 1st time your legs receive the positive g assault that acts on the lap bars, earning the ride the famed “Thighcrush” moniker. To add insult, after this assault, you immediately rise into one of the strongest air time hills on the ride, which literally does the exact same thing to you as you enter the 180* left hand in the opposite direction. I found this turn to be bumpy and despite trying to hold up my restraint, each bump still managed to ratchet it down a little more with each small jolt. The third airtime hill is just as strong as the others. I think this is where the trim brake is (I never got a front row ride until that night and I did not see it.) The 3rd turn is not as strong in the positive G’s as the other two, but the ride has not really let up any speed yet. The Stengal dive is really the only brake you get from the brutal ejector air you receive, but it acts to set you up. The trick track, I assume serves to set up the final 180* turn, but it just acted as a jaw breaker for me as I leaned to the left, only to be snapped quickly to the right. The last 2 airtime hills are absolutely gripping, launching you upwards before snapping you down in rapid succession. The rise into the brake run looks like it would give you one final airtime assault, but fortunately (if your lap bar has indeed ratcheted down from the other G-force turns), it does not.

Now I’m going to do “the good”. If you LOVE airtime (I don’t mean regular airtime. I’m talking the “oh my &^&K, I’m going to die” airtime), Skyrush is your dream come true. Every hill delivers butt-lifting out of the seat airtime. The park claims hills with as much as -2 g’s. I don’t believe there is another coaster on the planet that can claim that kind of negative G action across every hill. The ride is a literal assault on your body, positive G’s, negative G’s, lateral G’s, all extreme. This is NOT a “family ride.” This is also not a ride for casual riders. You must actively ride this ride, bracing for every element. To put your hands up and try to casually ride is a kiss of death. You have to hold on, not just to protect your thighs from the restraints, but to brace for the sudden G-force changes. I learned to keep my back against the seat back and fold my legs back under the wing seats to keep my fulcrum at my hips. Too many people ride with their legs straight down like on an inverted coaster. When the bar ratchets down, I still have my upper thighs free to bend.

Summary, Hersheypark is now home to the most extreme steel coaster on the planet. The only thing holding it back from being my new number one is the length. People are trying to compare it to I-305, El Toro, even the Voyage. While elements of those rides are present in Skyrush, it really does not compare to any of them. Skyrush can only be compared to Skyrush as there is nothing like it anywhere.

Now, the real question. What is the future of Skyrush? I’ve been reading the comments on several coaster boards and universally, the restraints are bothering the majority of people. Hershey is not turning a deaf ear to these complaints and have already switched to a squishy material on the undersides of them on train 1. Train 2 will supposedly follow after the 4th of July holiday. From talking to people who have ridden both trains, this is a fix that will work for some people, but I doubt it will not solve the “problem” with the ride. I was not willing to allow the restraints to ratchet down on me to test the new material, but I did stand by the brake run for around 20 mins to observe people’s reaction (before I knew which train had the new material). It was clear the discomfort was more on the 2nd train, however, there are people that just do not like that feeling of being thrust out of the seat repeatedly into the restraints. No matter what they change the material to, that will not change in the ride’s current configuration. Now, imagine if they put I-305’s soft shoulder restraints on it. Sure, I-305 has some airtime moments, but those hills are fairly large and somewhat floaty. Every hill on Skyrush is a stabbing motion of suddenly being popped up and slammed down. That action is not going to be any more comfortable with OTSR’s as it currently runs. The solution I can see would require an I-305 type pad without the huge, bulky tray table style hand grips on the front of it, but after my 11 rides Saturday, I see why Intamin does not feel comfortable with this set up. You need the large base to make sure that someone is not ejected. Strengthening the restraint “springs” has been brought up as a solution. Well, I don’t believe there are springs with hydraulic restraints. I was able to successfully hold mine up for 2 rides. It is exhausting and after that, I was could feel it ratcheting down under my grip. I doubt Intamin has any mechanism in their coaster inventory that could hold the restraints in place under the intense G-forces it exerts.

GP seems to be speaking with their feet regarding Skyrush. When the URC group went in mid June, the line got shorter throughout the day with very few people interested in a reride. Saturday, I completely avoided the area in the morning (focusing on the Western and Midway America rides), but the ride still had a more sizable line once the water park let out. I felt like these, too were 1st time riders. Among the enthusiasts, obviously everyone was there to ride Skyrush for ERT, but after the 1st 15 minutes of our ERT, the amount of riders dropped off to “pick your seat to stay on” from rows 3 on back. Oh yeah, the front seat is absolutely unbelievable and the best seat in the house (this coming from a person who likes the back seat on everything). I have never ridden a coaster where you get ejector airtime on the 1st drop in the front row and Skyrush does it. With that being said, I say we have a possible Drachen Fire or OTSR FOF situation, where the ride will command a long line in the morning hours then be a walk-on in the afternoon/evening once Hershey puts another ride in to draw the attention from Skyrush (I would have said 2014, but I think the new restraint material may have bought them another year of satisfied riders.) Those who like Skyrush will ride it. Those who don’t will avoid it, claiming it is too rough for them. It is unfortunate that a ride of such extremes can get the same label as terrible rides like SOB, Mean Streak, and Arrow Loopers. Once again Skyrush is not rough, but it requires active riding.
One last thing I have to comment on. It really annoys me when parks put on events for enthusiasts and some people feel the need to complain to park personnel about minutia that is out of their control, giving us all a bad name. As a former ride op, I have heard all the enthusiast excuses for thinking ride rules do not apply to them. During ERT, a guy next to me was complaining to the ride ops that he could not put his fanny pack to the side of his body because the ride “hurt too much”. (this about halfway into our session.) Obviously, he must have got away with it earlier otherwise he would not have been so adamant in refusing to do so, holding up the entire loading process. The op was being very kind, trying to explain that the restraint had to touch his body, the pack interfered, she’s really sorry. After about 2 minutes of this I had enough and just said to him “it’s to keep your butt from flying out!” (I wanted to add “dumb#@$ to it, but refrained.) He then looked at me, looked back at her, who nodded but said nothing, them he moved his fanny pack to the proper position. I was probably not a good ride op as I would be too blatant with people when they were insistent about disobeying ride rules “ma’am, I’m sorry if your child has ridden this ride today by accident, but he is not tall enough now and he is not safe” or "sir, the harness has to touch your shoulders or you may not ride" or "the ride is broke. Ride some other stuff, look up in the sky every now and then and come back when you see it running." After our ride, the guy immediately came back up the entrance to ride again and this time was complaining the park suits who were obviously trying to judge our reactions to the ride. We were on the “bad” train, so I can assume he wanted to switch to the “good” one. Seriously, if the ride hurts you that bad, DON’T RIDE!! I just hope they guy will be seen as the nutjob individual he is and not "those coaster enthusiasts."

Paul

* This post was modified at 7/2/12 10:15:52 AM *

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by GoYanks34 GoYanks34 Profile at 7/2/12 8:48:00 PM
Wow, that was a dissertation! Nicely done. I agree with just about everything you've said except I don't see the joy in it. I do agree that the ride is not rough - just violent in the way it throws your body in directions it was never made to go. I do hope they do some modifications and make it more comfortable without completely neutering it (no pun intended since I'm a vet LOL!). I actually think if the restraints were around the waist area instead of on top of the thighs it would solve 2 problems:

1. Your thighs would not feel like they're about to be amputated and you wouldn't have to expend all of your energy trying to hold the restraints up

2. It would staple your back against the seat better and reduce the unnatural twists and turns that break your body. It took 2 weeks before I stopped having spasms in my back from that stupid ride and I don't have back problems! (at least I didn't before riding Skyrush)

That's my solution anyway!

Jen

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by frontrow frontrow Profile at 7/2/12 8:59:40 PM
A few questions Paul. Is the coaster big guy friendly or do you see the walk of shame often? Is the ejector air time as extreme as El Toro? If I plan on waiting for front seat, how much longer of a wait should I expect?
Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by chitlins73 chitlins73 Profile at 7/2/12 9:44:25 PM
This ride has WAY more pure fun violent ejector air than El toro,lol.It is in a league of its own!! I disagree with Paul on what is the best seat.It's so funny because I usually like the front on most rides and Paul likes the back but we are on opposite sides on this choice of seat.The back gives way more intense ejector air than the front.I did the back at night so maybe that had something to do with it but I just noticed quite a difference from front to back as far as airtime.Both front and back are great rides though so you wont lose.Just make sure you do an end seat!!!
Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by hersheyworker hersheyworker Profile at 7/2/12 10:06:49 PM
I love Skyrush, after the first ride I wasn't so sure that I like it but once I got used to the thigh discomfort I really enjoyed the ride.

I will also vote for last row wing seat for the best seat on the ride.

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by MABrider MABrider Profile at 7/2/12 10:33:19 PM
I rode Skyrush only twice, during Saturday's event evening ERT. Not the best sample set, but enough to discover the two most noticeable things about this new ride: the sudden, massive ejector airtime jolts and the discomfort on the thighs while experiencing every one.

I rode only the train with the "improved" restraints at Saturday's event so I guess I got the best of Skyrush in its current iteration.

I experienced those massive jolts of airtime and as the mind said "YES!" the body (thighs) yelled "NO!"

And I determined that if only the restraint would remain in the same position as when I left the station I could probably come away after each ride in a better frame of mind, having been able to position myself to avoid the thigh crunches for the most part. But it kept pressing down harder and harder during the ride.

Skyrush certainly provides moments of more sudden intense airtime than any other coaster I have experienced, the complete opposite of floater air. The lift hill is very fast, the ride has great speed and I liked the amazingly quick transitions (which did not hurt me).

But riders have to deal with those restraints.

As noted by others, I also wonder what the future will see being done to Skyrush.

Why do brand new Intamins always have issues?

Mike B.
Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by alpengeistno3 at 7/2/12 10:48:45 PM
GoYanks34 said:

Wow, that was a dissertation! Nicely done. I agree with just about everything you've said except I don't see the joy in it.

Jen, you know I felt the same way at the end of our night. Going back and learning to ride without feeling like I was put through a wresting match with Andre the Giant, I got a new appreciation for just how intense the ride is.

GoYanks34 said:

I do agree that the ride is not rough - just violent in the way it throws your body in directions it was never made to go. I do hope they do some modifications and make it more comfortable without completely neutering it (no pun intended since I'm a vet LOL!). I actually think if the restraints were around the waist area instead of on top of the thighs it would solve 2 problems:


1. Your thighs would not feel like they're about to be amputated and you wouldn't have to expend all of your energy trying to hold the restraints up

2. It would staple your back against the seat better and reduce the unnatural twists and turns that break your body. It took 2 weeks before I stopped having spasms in my back from that stupid ride and I don't have back problems! (at least I didn't before riding Skyrush)

That's my solution anyway!

This is true, but the extreme negative g's seem to, in the park's and Intamin's minds. require something larger, ie, your thighs to hold you in. It is an ingenious way to combat the problem of securing larger vs smaller riders as most everyone's thighs reside in the same place, regardless of their size. I would think they could adjust the fulcrum of where the restraint contacts you, but if they try to secure you at the waist, that will require the harness to go down further for people who have no waist (ie, super skinny) and disqualify those who have larger waists and we are back to the El Toro problem.

By the way, someone asked about the restraints (I only browsed the comments before replying.) The restraints seemed very large person friendly and I saw no one take the "walk of shame" during ERT. The prevalent opinion is that the larger you are, the more the restraints will bother you, but I don't believe that has been proven yet as many smaller riders rode with just as much discomfort as the larger ones.

Paul

* This post was modified at 7/2/12 10:49:33 PM *

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by alpengeistno3 at 7/2/12 11:01:46 PM
MABrider said:

I rode Skyrush only twice, during Saturday's event evening ERT. Not the best sample set, but enough to discover the two most noticeable things about this new ride: the sudden, massive ejector airtime jolts and the discomfort on the thighs while experiencing every one.


I rode only the train with the "improved" restraints at Saturday's event so I guess I got the best of Skyrush in its current iteration.

I experienced those massive jolts of airtime and as the mind said "YES!" the body (thighs) yelled "NO!"

And I determined that if only the restraint would remain in the same position as when I left the station I could probably come away after each ride in a better frame of mind, having been able to position myself to avoid the thigh crunches for the most part. But it kept pressing down harder and harder during the ride.

Skyrush certainly provides moments of more sudden intense airtime than any other coaster I have experienced, the complete opposite of floater air. The lift hill is very fast, the ride has great speed and I liked the amazingly quick transitions (which did not hurt me).

But riders have to deal with those restraints.

As noted by others, I also wonder what the future will see being done to Skyrush.

Why do brand new Intamins always have issues?

Sorry I missed you, Mike. I alternated trains for the 1st 2 rides, then wound up on the unchanged train for the rest of the night. We must have just missed each other.

The problem is the G forces in the 1st 2 turns are what is causing them to ratchet down. I don't know what it was, but the 2nd turn was the worst as it was slightly bumpy and each bump would cause it to tighten a little more despite my strongest efforts to hold it up. I found that by tucking my legs back under the wing seat on the 1st airtime hill, I could tense my leg muscles to keep enough room to get through that turn and the rest of the ride. On the last 2 hills, I could push up over the tops so I would not get snapped, but once you lose that fight in the beginning, you are done!

I commented somewhere that there seems to be a pattern with Intamin...any park that spends $25 million on one their rides seems to have "headaches" and "downtime" included. More parks should read those contracts carefully before signing :)

Paul

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by alpengeistno3 at 7/2/12 11:14:31 PM
frontrow said:

A few questions Paul. Is the coaster big guy friendly or do you see the walk of shame often? Is the ejector air time as extreme as El Toro? If I plan on waiting for front seat, how much longer of a wait should I expect?

Ahh, there is the comment I had seen. The seats seem very big guy friendly. I did not see anyone take the walk of shame, so I suspect if you can get on I-305, you should be good for Skyrush.

El Toro has ejector air. Skyrush's air is 100xs more extreme than that due to the small size of the hills. There is no float. You are thrust up into the restraints and slammed down into the seat in preparation for the next one. I say the most comparable feeling would be Magnum's final bunny hops if you took them right after the 1st 72 mph drop!

The front line look daunting, but I would anticipate it would not be any longer than I-305's since it does seat 4 as opposed to two. I only waited 2 trains from just where you entered the station. Rough guess, 30-45 mins if you are at the bottom of the stairs and they are cycling trains fairly consistently.

Paul

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by alpengeistno3 at 7/2/12 11:21:23 PM
chitlins73 said:

This ride has WAY more pure fun violent ejector air than El toro,lol.It is in a league of its own!! I disagree with Paul on what is the best seat.It's so funny because I usually like the front on most rides and Paul likes the back but we are on opposite sides on this choice of seat.The back gives way more intense ejector air than the front.I did the back at night so maybe that had something to do with it but I just noticed quite a difference from front to back as far as airtime.Both front and back are great rides though so you wont lose.Just make sure you do an end seat!!!

You know, normally I agree, but when you can get ejector air on the 1st drop in the front along with all the other crazy ejector air throughout the rest of the layout, the front wins for (yes, I am going to say it) the visuals. (you have no idea how it pains me to say this :(

The first drop is absolutely insane in the back and still my seat of choice for the long haul, but that front seat ride was unbelievable and I strongly recommend getting it at least once if the opportunity presents itself. I actually spent the majority of my rides not having to get off of row 3, so it is safe to say there is NO bad seat on this ride. People say that all the time, but on Skyrush, it really is true.

Paul

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by bell88 at 7/6/12 3:46:52 PM
Unfortunately, I went on this yesterday and Thighcrush is the understatement of the year. I am still in pain this morning. Unless they fix this ride, I vow never to go on it again. It was awful.
Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by alpengeistno3 at 7/6/12 7:31:54 PM
^^^Yet another "satisfied" customer. Way to go, Intamin!!

Paul

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by GoYanks34 GoYanks34 Profile at 7/6/12 9:28:17 PM
alpengeistno3 said:

^^^Yet another "satisfied" customer. Way to go, Intamin!!


Paul

I would imagine before they (Intamin) build something they have prototypes made. Did they not realize that the lap bar would ratchet down the way it does when riding or did they think that the pain would be tolerable? Either way HUGE mistake.

There really is no excuse in this day and age to have something that expensive and brand new be that uncomfortable to the point it is practically un-ridable for many.

If they do make modifications to the ride's restraint system does Hershey have to pay for it or is it under some sort of warranty? Just curious as to how that would work.

Jen

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by alpengeistno3 at 7/6/12 10:53:15 PM
GoYanks34 said:

alpengeistno3 said:

^^^Yet another "satisfied" customer. Way to go, Intamin!!


Paul

I would imagine before they (Intamin) build something they have prototypes made. Did they not realize that the lap bar would ratchet down the way it does when riding or did they think that the pain would be tolerable? Either way HUGE mistake.

Agreed. All those coaster programs say those computer models can measure every possible force through every portion of the course. They test these things months advance of opening with dummies with all kinds of meters on them, with humans, etc. I don't understand how the roll on Maverick, the wheel issue on Intimidator, or the restraint issues on Skyrush have all managed to not be discovered until opening day.

GoYanks34 said:

If they do make modifications to the ride's restraint system does Hershey have to pay for it or is it under some sort of warranty? Just curious as to how that would work.

I heard KD did not pay anything for any of the modifications to I-305. Our guide on the maintenance tour, however, gave the park credit for modifying the restraint material on Skyrush. I would think that would have to come from Intamin, especially since it is the same color/mold as the old ones.

Paul

Re: My complete breakdown of Skyrush by drachen drachen Profile at 7/24/12 4:49:56 PM
MABrider said:

I experienced those massive jolts of airtime and as the mind said "YES!" the body (thighs) yelled "NO!"

Why do brand new Intamins always have issues?

This is EXACTLY what Skyrush is! It's such a conflict between body and mind. That actually frustrates me a little... I want to love the ride, but I just can't.

As to why Intamin's have issues... I don't know. You think parks would start to notice this pattern with them. But, they make a great product for several million less than a pristine, mechanically sound B&M. I guess money talks.

I'm digging up old posts that I wanted to respond to. This was certainly one of them.

Paul, I enjoyed the read and agree with you on most everything you said about Skyrush. I'm not ready to put it into my top tier of steel coasters. In fact, I had put it in my top 10 after ride number two. But after ride numbers three and four, I dropped it out again.

I don't think the new restraints have done anything for the ride experience. It's not the padding, but the bar underneath that is the problem. The softer cushion lets you feel the bar more. It's still not pleasant.

The first drop seems to be getting better and better. My most recent ride, about a week ago, was a back seat wing ride. You get a lot of float cresting the lift - more than Storm Runner, Ka, and Dragster. Then the train just tries to dump you out as you drop. It's quite intense, and like you said, is so wrong. But it's so wrong it's great.

I still have yet to notice the head-chopper on the third hill. That tells me, it's not that great. Like I've said before, that is a missed opportunity there. That could have been amazing.

On my most recent ride, I noticed a lot of vibration on the turn between the intersecting hills. It feels like the wheels aren't rolling on the track - more like they're skipping across it.

If you don't hold on while riding, especially on the wing seats, the train really tosses you around. It's not painful, and pretty fun, but I'm glad that there is no OTS restraint. If that was the case, Skyrush would really hurt.

Again, nice write-up.

Regarding Looper, which I believe was mentioned in this thread somewhere. I posted this on Facebook after first riding it...

By way of review... sooperdooperLooper at Hersheypark feels GREAT with its new trains. I found the back/head rest to be a little awkward, but the seat was nice. The train feels heavier than the Giovanola version it was rolling with for the past 20 years.

The ride feels faster, and significantly smoother. The mid-course brake is minimal, and the train carries more speed into the finale. I felt forces tonight that I didn't know were there before - and I've ridden Looper too many times to count over the years.

The new magnetic brakes at the end are silky-smooth and allow you to glide through to the next friction brake that stops you - with a jolt.

All in all, I am very happy with the way this classic is running this year. New life has been breathed into one of my all-time nostalgic, and one of my all-time favorite roller coasters. Six Flags Magic Mountain, you really need to consider these trains and brakes for Revolution.

My Review

drachen
Coaster to Park Ratio: 4.87 / Steel to Wooden Ratio: 2.57 / Wooden Coaster Percentage: 28%
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